the blog of Seldom Seen Photography

Palouse Falls – a Photo Guide

Night at Palouse FallsThe Palouse region of Washington State is famous for its verdant spring hills and red barns. Steptoe Butte is a must-visit destination for many travel and nature photographers. I have shot in the Palouse several times, and blogged about it several years ago (see here and here). But one of the highlights of the region I missed until earlier this week – Palouse Falls.

Palouse Falls perhaps gets a bit less traffic than Steptoe Butte and the rest of the Palouse because it is a bit out-of-the-way, more of an outlier to the Palouse region than being in it. It is an hour and 45 minute drive from the falls to Steptoe Butte, and just a bit less to the town of Colfax, where many photographers stay during their trips to the region. If you are staying in Colfax, do you really want to get up at 3:30 a.m. to drive to Palouse Falls for sunrise when you could sleep an hour later and still get sunrise shots at Steptoe Butte?

But Palouse Falls is worth a visit. Perhaps the best way to visit, at least for prime photography times, is to camp there. Palouse Falls State Park has 11 tent camping spots (no trailer hookups; trailers and RVs are sometimes allowed to park overnight in the parking lot during non-peak periods) that are within 100 meters of prime viewpoints for photography.

The Palouse River falls about 185 feet over the edge of a canyon of basalt. Unlike the verdant hills of the Palouse further east of the falls, the falls are in desert. But there is plenty of green in the canyon below the falls, making a wonderful contrast with the black basalt and brown hills (or in spring, brown and green hills). The canyon below the falls is scenic on its own accord and would be worth a visit even without the falls. The canyon curves to the south just downstream from the falls. The campground is perched on the western canyon rim, and it is easy to walk to viewpoints that either look eastward directly toward the falls, or southward down the canyon. These southerly looking viewpoints are north of the parking lot and provide the best view – encompassing the falls and the downstream canyon. Be warned though, they are right on the edge of vertical drop of at least 250 feet straight down to the canyon floor, beyond the fence on the canyon rim near the campground and parking lot, and are not for those who are faint of heart or afraid of heights. To get the falls and downstream canyon both in single composition will require a wide-angle lens of about 18 mm or less on a camera with a full-frame sensor. My 17-40mm zoom worked well, but if you want more sky in the frame, you may want an even wider angle (or stitch together more than one shot).

The falls face west-southwest and receive direct sunlight in late morning through most of the afternoon during the spring (reportedly in summer they may be in partial shadow into the early afternoon). In the evening, the shadow of the canyon wall climbs up the falls, and before sunset, they are completely in shade. Similarly, the falls are completed shaded at sunrise. And, once the sun is up, it shines through and lights up the mist created by the falling water, making early morning shots of the falls more difficult.

However, if the clouds to the south light up during either sunset or sunrise, excellent photo opportunities await. You may want to use a split-neutral density filter to help control the contrast between the sky and the dark canyon below. Similarly, you may consider using HDR.

The falls are also a great location for Milky Way nightscape shots like I’ve discuss recently, and in fact that was the prime reason for my recent visit. In spring, the best viewpoint is again north of the parking lot, on the canyon rim (just be extra careful in the dark, it’s a long fall down). The falls will be completely dark, so light painting is recommended. When I was there, for the image above, I worked with a photo partner. One of us tripped the shutters on the cameras while the other used a spotlight to light paint the falls and canyon from the fenced viewpoint area near the parking lot.

It is possible to hike to the top of or bottom of the falls, though the trails are not maintained by the park. These unofficial trails are steep, so if you do take them, be extra careful. The one in from the south steeply drops off the canyon rim and circles midway along the canyon wall to the the top of the falls. At one point, almost directly below the main viewpoint by the parking lot, it is possible to get down to the river in the bottom of the canyon by dropping down a steep scree slope. The trail from the north, drops into the upper canyon from the railroad tracks that run west of the park. This is reportedly the easier way in, though you must hop a fence along the tracks to reach the trail and the descent is still steep. You should also be careful along the tracks because it is an active rail line. If you do take the northern route into the canyon, you will pass by a nice stretch of white water above the falls. There is certainly no need to take these trails into the canyon to get good photographs, the views from the top are spectacular (and indeed, during my recent trip, we did not hike into the canyon). Reportedly the trail continues several miles up canyon to Upper Palouse Falls, a fall of less than 20 feet, and during the spring, when the flow in the river is greatest and the area has plenty of blooming wildflowers, this may be a good day hike option.

Marmots are active around the main falls viewpoints, and with a bit of patience, you can get rather close to take portraits of these groundhog relatives. The park is also home to many types of birds. When there recently, I saw several varieties I had not seen before.

Overall, Palouse Falls is a great place for photography. It is worth a quick stop on your way to or from the Palouse; or better yet, spend the night there to experience the falls at sunrise and sunset. You won’t be disappointed.

Palouse Falls Sunset

Sunset view from the canyon rim north of the parking lot

Palouse Marmot

Marmots are plentiful around the viewpoints.

 

Typical view of the falls from the rim north of the parking lot.

Typical view of the falls from the rim north of the parking lot.

Palouse River Canyon

Sunrise on the downstream canyon, shot from near the main viewpoint by the parking lot.

Other photo opportunities include macro shots of this wild wheat (at least that is what I think it is).

Other photo opportunities include macro shots of this wild wheat (at least that is what I think it is).

Upper Canyon

The canyon and river above the falls. The northern trail into the canyon is in the upper lefthand corner of the image. This is an HDR image.

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15 responses

  1. Stunning photos!!

    May 25, 2015 at 10:54 pm

  2. Great stunning shots….You are awesome.

    May 25, 2015 at 11:15 pm

  3. Those waterfalls look amazing, great shots!

    May 26, 2015 at 4:26 am

  4. Fantástico lugar y excelente fotografía¡¡

    May 26, 2015 at 12:25 pm

  5. Sensational photos.

    May 27, 2015 at 10:33 pm

  6. very nice

    May 28, 2015 at 11:39 am

  7. Gorgeous photos! I’m new to photography and blogging and I’ve begun to travel a lot lately. This is all very inspiring.

    May 28, 2015 at 1:51 pm

    • Thanks for commenting. I feel honored my photography inspires you.

      May 29, 2015 at 8:48 am

  8. Reblogged this on Cubano Indiscreto and commented:
    especial

    June 3, 2015 at 9:33 am

  9. Nice, very nice, I like that…
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    June 17, 2015 at 10:10 am

  10. Amazing pics. Congratulations.

    June 27, 2015 at 8:40 am

  11. is beatiful

    June 30, 2015 at 12:27 pm

  12. Pingback: This One’s for Mark | joebeckerphoto

  13. Ich bin überwältigt , Danke !

    January 29, 2016 at 9:51 pm

  14. Pingback: RN Calendar 2017, the Story behind the Pictures | Robinson Noble

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