the blog of Seldom Seen Photography

Posts tagged “travel photography

Heading South

Later this month, Tanya and I will be off for a quick trip to Utah with friends. Nahla, unfortunately, gets to stay home with our housesitter. Rather than driving down like we usually do, due to only having a week for the trip, we will fly down to Salt Lake and rent a car. We plan on spending two days at Capital Reef National Park, before heading down to Escalante for two days, and finishing up with two days at Bryce Canyon National Park. This is a great time to go; it is usually sunny and warm, but not yet hot, with fewer thundershowers (than summer) ruining those slot canyon hikes. In anticipation of the trip, I’m posting a few shots from my past trips to the area. The one above is from the Grand Staircase – Escalante National Monument. The two below are from Capital Reef and Bryce Canyon. Looking forward to getting more shots like these.


Quick Shot – Upper Spokane Falls

Another quick shot for you. I spent most of last week in Spokane, but was not able to slip out and do much photography. However, one night I did get manage to escape and shoot some late evening shots in Riverfront Park. Though water levels were down a little bit from several weeks ago, the falls were still spectacular. This shot is of Upper Spokane Falls, taken from the Post Street Bridge. Enjoy!


Shutterbugged

Check out the May 2017 issue of Shutterbug magazine. I am one of six photographers featured in the Business Trends column by Maria Piscopo, titled “Have Camera, Will Travel, How to Turn Your Love for Travel Photography into Business.” I’m not sure where Maria heard about me, or how I qualified as I only do professional photography part time. But I’m glad she did choose me for the article. It was fun being interviewed and being published in a photography magazine.

For the article, Maria interviewed me (and the other five photographers), asking several questions including “What skills or areas of expertise do you think a photographer in this field has to develop for a successful business?” and “How do you market your photography services? What works best for you and what changes did you make for 2017?” The magazine asked me to send in several of my favorite travel shots, and the one above (from John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in Oregon) is the one they picked to publish in the magazine.

The article is not yet available on line, and presently is only available in the print magazine on page 50.

 


Quick Shot – Columbia National Wildlife Refuge

Last weekend, I drove to Spokane to see my Dad. Rather than take the interstate the whole way, I drove a slightly longer, but more scenic route, that took me through the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge. I was hoping that spring had brought wildflowers to the refuge, but I was too early in the season (I think the wildflowers in eastern Washington are late this year – does anyone have a wildflower report for the area?). No flowers, but wonderful dynamic skies, as I hope this shot shows. I didn’t have much time for photography, it is a five-hour drive without stops after all, but did get a few “keepers.” Enjoy this quick shot of  the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Washington.


Whitney Gardens – Hidden Gem

A week ago, on a trip with Tanya and her mother, we stopped at Whitney Gardens and Nursery in Brinnon, Washington. This place is hidden gem for photography, especially in the spring when the rhododendrons and azaleas are blooming.

Whitney Garden covers 7 acres in the small town of Brinnon along the west shore of Hood Canal. They have a huge collection of azaleas (about 220 types) and both hybrid (about 700 varieties)  and species (about 150 varieties) rhododendrons as well as camellias, magnolias, and many other plants. The rhodies start blooming in February and the color peaks in early May. When we were there last weekend, there was plenty of color to photography, though you could easily see the place will be a riot of blooms later next month. With many deciduous trees and bushes, it is probably also  colorful in the fall, though I have only been there in spring time.

 

There is an admission fee of $1 per person. The garden is open year round, with garden viewing hours from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. February through October and until 4:30 p.m. in November through January.

I captured the photo above, and the first three below, last weekend. The remaining images below I took several years ago in mid-May. The garden will be in its prime soon; don’t miss it.

Rhodie